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Technology Name
Briefcase
Scientist
1392
A catalytic based reaction for the treatment of industrial waste water. Millions of tons of organic chemical compounds - including solvents, petrochemicals, agrochemicals, and pharmaceuticals - are produced every year by a wide variety of chemical industries. Two immediate problems arise: 1. Industrial...

A catalytic based reaction for the treatment of industrial waste water. Millions of tons of organic chemical compounds - including solvents, petrochemicals, agrochemicals, and pharmaceuticals - are produced every year by a wide variety of chemical industries. Two immediate problems arise: 1. Industrial production of these chemicals and/or other products leads to effluent streams - highly toxic, contaminated aqueous solutions - from factories. These effluents must be treated prior to release of the water back into the environment. 2. Following use, these chemicals (e.g., agrochemicals, pharmaceuticals) become serious pollutants as they eventually find their way into the soil, sediment, and surface and/or groundwater environments. Current treatment methods are severely limited. Treatment of effluent streams by, e.g., filtration, photocatalysis, or bioreactors is often highly ineffective - the waste compounds not being easily captured, degraded or transformed - and/or prohibitively expensive.

Applications


  • Detoxification of industrial effluents, especially from petrochemical, agrochemical and pharmaceutical industries 
  • Waste water decontamination 
  • In situ and ex situ remediation of water polluted by organic and other contaminants

Advantages


  • Cost efficient
  • Quick

Technology's Essence


Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science have developed a new process for degradation and/or treatment of practically any organic contaminant in aqueous solutions under oxidizing (aerobic) conditions. A suite of catalytic materials has been developed which allows both in situ and ex situ remediation of polluted water by oxidative chemical degradation of contaminants. The technology eliminates or reduces a broad range of water pollutants - industrial organic solvents, petrochemicals, agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals (e.g., endocrine disruptors such as antiobiotics and hormones) - and is particularly effective for treating concentrated industrial effluents, under technically convenient conditions. The reaction products consist essentially of benign materials.

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  • Prof. Brian Berkowitz
1448
A method to produce amides in one step without any unwanted by-products, by coupling of alcohols with amines with the liberation of hydrogen gas, catalyzed by unique ruthenium complexes. Amides are widely used in the industry (e.g. nylon, Kevlar) and have widespread importance in biochemical and...

A method to produce amides in one step without any unwanted by-products, by coupling of alcohols with amines with the liberation of hydrogen gas, catalyzed by unique ruthenium complexes.

Amides are widely used in the industry (e.g. nylon, Kevlar) and have widespread importance in biochemical and chemical systems (e.g. proteins). Synthesis of amides is mostly based on activated acid derivatives or rearrangement reactions induced by an acid or base, which often produce toxic chemical waste and involve tedious procedures. Therefore, an efficient synthesis that avoids wasteful use of coupling reagents or corrosive acidic and basic media is highly desirable. The current technology allows for the clean production of amides from amines and alcohols.

Applications


  • Production of amides for various applications (plastic and rubber industry, paper industry, pharmaceutical intermediates, etc.)

  • Use of the liberated hydrogen (e.g. for the production of ammonia)


Advantages


  • Clean and selective procedure

  • Environment friendly reaction (no base or acid promoters are required, no carboxylic acid derivatives, such as acid chlorides, are needed)

  • Amides and molecular hydrogen are produced in high yields and high turnover numbers directly from alcohols in one step

  • The liberated hydrogen can be used for different applications

  • Formation of a variety of amides


Technology's Essence


Amide formation is a fundamental reaction in chemical synthesis. Amides are commonly formed from the reaction of a carboxylic acid derivative with an amine. Instead of using carboxylic acid derivative, in the present invention the amide motif is generated by direct acylation of amines with alcohols. This is possible through the use of a unique catalyst. This method enables the simple and elegant production of amide polymers and industrially important amides.

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  • Prof. David Milstein
1506
A simple electrochemical method and apparatus for the continues production of CO (carbon monoxide) from CO2 as chemical storage for electrical energy and a basic material for further organic products. Constant progress is made in solar and wind alternative energy production. Unfortunately, these...

A simple electrochemical method and apparatus for the continues production of CO (carbon monoxide) from CO2 as chemical storage for electrical energy and a basic material for further organic products.

Constant progress is made in solar and wind alternative energy production. Unfortunately, these systems are weather and time-dependent. Additionally, most of the geographic areas best suited for harvesting these resources are remote from population centers. Therefore the need for a reliable method to store and transport renewable energy is clear.

CO can be easily converted into methanol, which is one of the major chemical raw materials and can by itself be used as fuel for diesel engines and the energy source for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC).

At present no reliable method of CO2 to CO reduction is available. Either using low temperatures which leads to low thermodynamic efficiency (<60%), Requires precious metals for electrodes and results in toxic byproducts, or using high temperatures which Requires pure CO2 input and Produces a mixture of CO2 and CO.

The current technology describes an efficient, flexible, continues method for production of CO at high temperatures (900oC) without any byproducts or toxic materials.

Applications


  • Production of CO from CO2
  • Easy conversion into methanol

Advantages


·         No precious (Pt, Ag, Au, Pd) metals required

·         No hazardous chemicals involved, no pollution

·         Continuous operation is possible

·         One can use flue gas as a source

·         Capture of CO2 from air is possible

·         The system is very compact>20 kW/m3

·         Operation conditions are very flexible

·         The process fits existing infrastructure

·         CO can be easily converted into liquid fuel (CH3OH)


Technology's Essence


The outlined technology overcomes the basic problems of CO production by using molten Li2CO3 as the electrolyte, a Ti container (will not undergo corrosion), Ti cathode (does not catalyze decomposition of CO), and a graphite anode (no chemical reaction with Li2CO3). At 900°C and current density of 0.05-2 A/cm2, this unique system enables a thermodynamic efficiency close to 100%, continues production of CO – efficiently separating CO2 to CO and O2.

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  • Prof. Igor Lubomirsky
1124
Label-free detection and monitoring of target molecules, which can be conducted using standard lab equipment. This new method of optical analysis is effective in monitoring the binding of chemically or physically adsorbed molecules, in liquid or gas phase, with measurements carried out continuously in...

Label-free detection and monitoring of target molecules, which can be conducted using standard lab equipment. This new method of optical analysis is effective in monitoring the binding of chemically or physically adsorbed molecules, in liquid or gas phase, with measurements carried out continuously in real-time.

SPR and LSPR technologies are broadly used in efficient real-time detection and quantification of biomolecules in research environments; however these technologies are too complicated, cumbersome and expensive for routine applications. This novel technology combines real-time, high sensitivity and accuracy of LSPR with low cost and ease of use of other optical assays, such as ELISA.

The invention comprises the LSPR transducer element of a gold-island film biosensor, which does not suffer shortcomings such as extreme temperature sensitivity. The gold island film is rapidly integrated into lab consumables via a novel fabrication method, which produces a robust system for high-throughput molecular diagnostics.

Applications


  • Point of care, real time diagnostics of chemical and biological substances.
  • Environmental watch: monitoring air or water pollution, testing for food poisoning.
  • Chemical warfare: detection of chemical agents and explosives.
  • Real-time monitoring of marine biofouling or industry corrosion processes.

Advantages


  • Simple operation, versatile and inexpensive method to imbed sensor in standard lab consumables.
  • High-throughput label-free detection with sensitivity comparable to that of SPR.
  • Uses cheap, disposable samples.
  • Can be combined with a variety of biosensing technologies.

Technology's Essence


The method involves evaporation of ultrathin (?10 nm) gold films onto inert transparent substrates (e.g., glass, plastic) leading to the formation of a layer of gold islands. Gold-island films provide unique optical properties. Such films show a localized surface plasmon (LSP) absorption peak much less sensitive to the refractive index of the surrounding medium. The LSP absorption band changes upon binding of various molecules to the surface. The binding process can be followed quantitatively by measuring the changes in the gold SP absorption. Selective sensing using the LSPR method can be achieved by applying a thin layer containing receptor molecules onto the gold island film, and measuring changes in the SP absorption upon binding of a specific analyte to the receptor layer

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  • Prof. Israel Rubinstein

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